Wednesday, 22 April 2015

Exploring translucency

I so liked the effect in the candle wax resist that I posted last week that I've been trying out several more resists in my daily mark making.

Here I'm posting one using olive oil and painted over with black acrylic which, because it made the paper translucent, had more impact when photographed up against a window so the light glowed through ...


and this, the reverse, perhaps even more interesting because of its subtlety when the paper was turned over and held against the light ...


I liked the beading of the paint on the surface of the oil which this technique produced and which didn't appear with other resists. The drawback was that the surface took a long time to dry and I had to be careful not to touch it for a few hours or I would have lost the more delicate marks.

I suspect that many of these resist ideas are much easier to achieve on paper's crisp and more rigid surface. Transferring them to fabric could then be done with digital photography and an image manipulation package - but I will try some directly on fabric and see what happens.



6 comments:

  1. These are beautiful. Oil on fabric? Doesn't sound like a good mix to me, I don't think the oil would ever dry. Digital images of papers sound like the ideal solution.

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    1. I'm sure you are right about the oil on fabric. I may try marbling, though. I was intending rather to try the wax resists ... and I guess you never know what may happen

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  2. You are just having too much fun, Margaret 😀.
    I like the looks of these marks.

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    1. Thank you, Sharron. I am having fun and just beginning to see where it may lead ... more will follow if it works out.

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  3. Even though I've often printed out my photo manipulations onto fabric, I never think about the fact that I could scan successful experiments of paint on paper to then print on fabric rather than painting the fabric directly. That even tho I know several art quilters who do just that. It just never occurs to me once at work myself. This is probably the perfect example of why to circumvent using a particular technique directly on cloth. That beading up and translucency is very special.

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    1. Thank you for your great comment. I will certainly be printing either or both of these images onto fabric - as well as trying out some different shapes that fit into previous work.

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