Wednesday, 19 October 2016

Wednesday Printmaking

Today was printmaking day again at the yard: ART space with Sue Brown. More entertainment was had with viscosity inking over the intaglio plates made in the previous three weeks. I had found this great fun when I tried it before (here) and was looking forward to using it again. (For further explanation of what this is all about, see the end of this post).

As I was well aware that my plates had problems (chiefly too little contrast), viscosity inking offered the chance of some relief in the shape of unexpected splashes of bright colour to brighten up the rather muted and uninteresting plates. I was not disappointed.




The viscosity inking and the cutting in half of one of the plates (image 3 above) have certainly lifted things and I feel I've achieved something.

I feel also that I'm just beginning to get a tiny glimmer of understanding about what makes an effective plate and how to achieve it and, thanks to Sue's reminders, how to keep my prints clean. We have a week off now for half-term. Then there is the opportunity to design a fresh plate or two using whichever combination of techniques takes our fancy from those we've been shown this term.

I'm looking forward to that. We've been given card for the new plate and have the chance to work on plans for a design or two before the next class. I've even made myself a list of dos and don'ts when making the plate ... so here's hoping for better results at each stage ...

PS For those who, like I was before I did this course, have no idea about viscosity inking, I've added two links that explain things here and here. The first includes a YouTube video and was not quite what we did but it explains the whole process better than the others I found. Our inking process gave much more intense colour differences and was somehow simpler.

The process allows three different colours to be added to a print with a single pass through the press. The first colour is applied (but not printed) in the normal way. The second and third colours use inks of different viscosities (thicknesses). The second is thin and runny, the consistency of cream, and the third is thick. They are applied one after the other over the first layer of ink with rollers and with no cleaning off in between. The plate is then printed.  If you're interested in printing, it's a technique that's definitely worth following up.

6 comments:

  1. This looks quite fascinating and your prints are DELICIOUS! Goodness, but you are always creating some wonderful pieces! What fun!

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    1. Thank you, Marny. It is a very effective process. I really enjoy exploring new media and new ways of working. This is certainly giving me something to think about!

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  2. Great prints, I was there the week before making books with Lesley.

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    1. Thank you, Debbie. Theyard:ARtspace is a great a facility. I'm so glad I found it. And funny - I had my eye on that book making workshop but I was busy and unable to go. It would have been good to meet you.

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  3. I like the description of the process...my roots are in print making so my heart beats a little faster reading steps! This third one is remarkable...lovely!

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    1. Thank you, Mary Ann. I don't know why but I hadn't realised your roots were in printing. I am very new to this process and have so much to learn but I'm enjoying the learning, with all its frustrations!

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