Tuesday, 26 May 2015

Drawing Edges and Lines

The primary act of drawing is circumscription - you place the tip of a mark-making tool on a ground and draw a line that goes around the subject represented ...

 and then ... Lines don't actually exist outside of drawing them. 

Tania Kovats Drawing Water 2014 

I came across these two apparently slightly contradictory quotes about drawing when dipping again into Tania Kovat's beautiful book Drawing Water. This is a book I love and about which I blogged here at the end of March. 

Among so many other things, the book is full of thoughts about drawing, its meaning and ways of approaching it. I have been thinking about those thoughts ever since I first read the book so I went in search of quotes from it when I found this sample in a small pile of (sadly undated) drawings done sometime last year. It seemed to fit so neatly into the comment about 'circumscription'. 

Although I can't remember exactly when I completed it, I do remember clearly that the circumscription of the shapes was the most important thing for me at the time I was drawing - as it so often is. I set out to delineate the outline of the gourd and the branch, the forms within and the shapes of the shadows cast as my primary concern, together with the pattern they seemed to make. 



Strange to think that the lines were in my mind rather than on the gourd and the branch I was drawing and that they did not in truth exist purely as lines at all. ....


12 comments:

  1. intriguing way to "look"

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    1. Thank you for your comment, Arlee. It is an approach to drawing that I use often, especially with natural objects. It seems to lead especially easily to abstraction.

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    1. Tania Kovat's book has many such thoughts ... lots to think about.

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  3. 'First you think, then you draw a line around your think.' which is, I believe, an anonymous quote from a child. I love the concept (ah yes, but if I try and put it on paper, does it then become a drawing and lose its intrinsic quality of 'concept'?)
    And I love your drawing, all those lovely tones, that would look so gorgeous in fabric....

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    1. What an interesting anonymous quote that is, Marny ... and, with your bracketed question, you give me even more to think about!

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    1. Thank you, Wendy. I know I should draw more often ...

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  5. An absolutely fabulous drawing Margaret ! Love it !
    (especially love that quote of Marny's .. too cute )

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    1. Thank you very much for your lovely comment, Sharron. A long time ago I went to a drawing class where I did lots of this kind of careful observed drawing. Seeing this again reminded me that I should make time for it more often. I don't know where the time goes ... browsing the internet ...?!

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  6. Came by for a quick catch-up and stayed to think - thanks Margaret :)

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    1. A pleasure to have you comment! The quotes when I first read them and the drawing when I refound it have both made me think too ... so much does ...

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